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social media

advertising branding marketing rants and ramblings reputation management social media

Millennial with a mobile phone doesn’t necessarily equate to social media marketer

You’ve worked for years on your brand. You’ve carefully crafted a look and feel for your company. You have that elevator speech down to an actual fucking art, you can make someone want to hand you money if you have 3 minutes alone with them.

Things have changed in the past few years. Now it appears that every business has to be on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram if they want reach consumers. You don’t want to spend time every day trying to monitor online activities and posting narcissistic images, but you have several staff members or family members or family members of staff members that seem to love to use social media. These odd acquaintances have 1000s of followers and can talk all day long about social media and absolutely love to post pictures of their hair and the food they just ate. It seems natural to hand social media activities over to these little online zombies and let them use these ‘skills’ to build your brand and keep you in front of the public eye.

I see this happen almost daily. Brands handed over to people without backgrounds and education and experience in branding. Suddenly the online brands look very different than the brand that has been carefully crafted. The look and feel of your company that exists online would have made you cringe a few years ago. Logos are suddenly pink because it was more visible on the image that was stolen via a Google image search. Likes are counted as important when they have nothing to do with influence – quite often, the type of people that like the new online presence are not the least bit like your actual demographic, they just find the headline funny and notice that one of their ‘friends’ liked the post.

If your online branding is in the hands of someone that doesn’t handle branding for a living, take a look at it. Scour through every post with a new eye. Is this really how you want to be seen? Do the posts fit the carefully crafted messages you are putting forth elsewhere? You’ve been warned, your brand is crumbling in front of your eyes.

rants and ramblings social media

Every Client is the Most Important Client You’ll Ever Have

We’re all human, so there are certainly clients and projects that we get more excited about than others. Times that we wake up motivated and want to redouble our efforts to be the best we can be. There are also times that we would rather give a bath to a wildcat than deal with the client walking through the door.

Regardless of how excited or demotivated you are, you have to approach each client like they’re the most important client you’ll ever have, because they are.  In a world of instant communication (Yelp, Google reviews, Facebook, Twitter, Instagram), we have to consider just how quickly someone can tell the world how wonderful their experience was. A few years ago, you had to provide service to a news anchor to suddenly have 1000s of people see how talented you are…now, almost every customer can share satisfaction (or lack of) with the world.

Clearly, social media reputation management is not the only reason to treat clients like they’re the wonderful creatures they are, but it’s a strong enough motivator to keep it top-of-mind. Personal pride in your craft and a goal to move the industry forward are your driving force — just think of social media activity as those little bumps on the side of the road that alert you as you drift off the sides of the street. They aren’t the motivation to not die in a fiery crash, they’re the reminders to keep your ass in the road.

[originally published for Salon Today]

marketing social media wtf

5 reasons to update that MySpace Page!

What? Did I just show myself as outdated by referencing MySpace in a current article? Well, it’s still out there, along with dozens of other social media outlets and online tools you’ve used in the past.

Do a quick online search for your own name or company name. Don’t just look at the first page, scroll through a few pages of results. There’s a good chance you’re going to find several links to pages that are outdated.

Not updating your online presence can hurt you or your company. These are common sense, but nobody takes time to think about them. Here are five ways that outdated data is hurting you:

  1. The you of today isn’t the you of yesteryear. There’s a good chance that somewhere out there you’ll find a reference that your favorite hobby is dancing the Macarena, there may even be pictures of you doing it.
  2. Your skills and professional experience have changed. Social media profiles that are five years old likely list you working where you’re not with goals you achieved long ago.
  3. You don’t look the same. That mullet was really awesome back in the day wasn’t it? But is that how you want people to think you look now?
  4. Your contact data has changed. What if someone does want to reach you? Odds are, that email address or phone number has changed.
  5. You’ve grown up a bit. No matter what you’re age, you likely look back a few years at the things you’ve said and done and cringe at some of it. There may be a few things out there you want to delete and bury.

The internet doesn’t forget, and you shouldn’t either. Take the time to log into each of these tools and update your content (or deactivate the account). Make sure your online presence reflects who you are.

Taking the time to do this is time well spent. Sure, a few password resets will be needed, but it’s worth the effort. If people are searching for you, you want to know what they find.

As a bonus, you get a wonderful stroll down memory lane.

social media wtf

“Useless as tits on a boar hog”

I’ve heard the statement, “Useless as tits on a boar hog,” several times in my life, but I’d never taken the time to ponder what it meant…although it’s sort of common sense when you ponder it. I do believe it’s was a prophetic statement describing the value of and ‘endorsement’ on LinkedIn.

social media

Pandora’s Box of Social Media: 7 Things You Must Do

Odds are, everyone reading this has opened the Pandora’s Box of social media for their salon. It’s a mistake not to, because there are so many wonderful opportunities inside. However, oncethe box is open, you must be very careful to control what you let out. As a marketing consultant, I find myself spending more and more time helping people rein in many of the negative impacts of social media.

To help avoid letting loose all the evils of social media into your world, make sure you have these seven simple things under control.

Claim your social media presence on all social media sites. Make sure you have control of your own brand everywhere you can, not just on Facebook and Yelp. Have you updated your Google business page (you have one whether you know it or not)? Have you claimed a Vine account in your company name, just to make sure you control your own brand?

Keep control of your social media login information. Just because you have a great employee that has 15,000 Instagram or Facebook friends, this doesn’t mean they should have control of your accounts. Each week I’m approached by a salon that had an employee set up social media accounts, and now they can’t access them because they employee is gone.

Respond appropriately to the negatives as well as the positives. Be careful how you reply, but reply to those that say good or bad things about you online. If you’re angry when you’re about to reply to that Yelp comment, count to ten and re-read what you’re about to send.

Be active. Don’t post on Facebook once every 6 months. If you drive up to a restaurant and see no cars parked in the parking lot, you’ll assume they’re closed…in the same way, if someone visits you online and the last activity is a haircut in the previous year, they’re not going to think a lot is happening at the salon.

Be engaging. Don’t talk to people, communicate with them. Before Facebook, you didn’t simply stand on a street corner with a bullhorn yelling about what you’re doing, so don’t do that now. Engage your friends in conversation.

Be relevant. Don’t post things that don’t matter and aren’t related to your salon or your clients.

Be sensitive. When you share that bit of humor, make sure you consider how everyone will respond to it. The world may have grown a bit overly sensitive to being politically correct, but you do need to make sure that your sense of humor fits that of your followers.

(originally posted on Salon Today)

 

 

marketing social media

‘Likes’ aren’t the same as ‘influence’

How many times have you heard marketing professionals, or at least someone serving in the role of a marketing professional, brag about how many likes a post received? Likes are not the same as influence. Online posts are wonderful for spreading the word, for assisting in communications…but don’t lose site of the fact that unless you can truly motivate someone to act upon something, you are falling short. Focus far less on ‘likes’ and much more on the ability to make things happen.